Friday, April 3, 2009

Roll with us!

Think about all the books you've read--and I'm guessing that's a pretty high number so this may be tricky!

* Which is the character who's the most different from you? (And how? Use this as an excuse to tell us your own background and anything else about yourself that's important to your self-identity).
* Which is the author (this could be fiction, nonfiction, poetry, etc.) who is (or was) the most different from you?


The Neil Gaiman Audio Collection. I wasn't a audiobook kinda a girl. Neil Gaiman is a guy and he's British. He writes fantasy for children and adults. He tells outrageous stories. I'm an African American woman who typically goes for reality based fiction. I didn't read fairy tales as a child. I'm a now a huge Gaiman fan and the author ain't bad on the eyes.

The Arrival by Shaun Tan There are so many differences here for me. For starters, I was new to graphic novels but this wasn't only a graphic novel but a wordless one. I majored in English, I like words. I read women ninety percent of the time and usually women of color. Shaun Tan is a guy who is an incredible artist and storyteller. I can't draw a stick man. Highly recommend this.

Luna by Julie Anne Peters A teen recommended this to me a year or so ago. I had asked for recommendation for good teen LBGT. This was a perfect choice. I'm a heterosexual, adult black woman and Liam is a white, transgender boy who dreams of being the girl she really is. It's easy to identify how we differ and equally easy to find our connection: everyone wants to be accepted for who they are. We all struggle to define ourselves and want others to respect that only we get to decide how we live our lives.

*all titles are linked to reviews.

11 comments:

Yat-Yee said...

You've really captured the feeling of being an outsider. Liberal, artsy, educated: we will still slip up and make others feel uncomfortable. Thanks for showing grace.

GirlGriot said...

I love Neil Gaiman. I've only read his graphic novels (his Sandman series), but I think he fabulous. I've never seen a picture of him, however ... clearly I've got to amend that!

Ali said...

I will have to check out The Arrival, if only because I can't quite imagine a graphic novel with no words at all!

susan said...

Ali, at Shelfari, everyone was talking about it. It is a beautiful, moving piece of literature. And there was of course a discussion of the wordless literature.

Lenore said...

I have The Arrival too. Very nice.

As for characters that are unlike me... can't forget all the psycho killers that abound in literature.

susan said...

Lenore, but we're only asking you for 1. lol Don't tease us. Please participate in the meme and leave us a link.

Eva said...

Ohhh: tough questions! I'll think hard and write a post this week. :)

Shalonda said...

I am dying to read The Arrival and Luna sounds brilliant.

One character who comes to mind is Melinda from Speak. Culturally we are different in that she is white and I'm black. But looking even deeper, she has faced a terrible situation that I am thankful I never had to live with. In addition, she is more reserved and frightened to speak what is on her heart, where I feel more outspoken and free to say what I feel. But I love her for who she is. She is an amazing character with depth.

susan said...

Thanks for weighing in Shalonda. Hope you'll consider regularly participating and leaving a link to a full post on your blog.

Claudia said...

I completely agree with you about Gaiman. I tend to read his comics more, but I also consider American Gods to be one of my favorite books. He is a wonderful storyteller.

Ali said...

Shalonda, I haven't read Speak yet but from what I've heard about it, I can see what you mean about the character and how she reacts to things. I love it when a character does the opposite of what I would do, and yet I can understand his or her actions as clearly as if they were my own.